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BF1 Trash Cut content
The subject of this article, Tour of Duty, has been cut from the final version of a Battlefield game.


Tour of Duty is a game mode planned for Battlefield Vietnam but was cut in the final game. It was intended to act similarly to Campaign of Battlefield 1942, where 14 singleplayer maps would be played in a certain order, divided into three "chapters".

This mode restricted the player to one kit (both loadouts) per map, which would be different depending on the faction. It is unknown if this is the intended behavior of this mode. However, the player can still pick up other kits dropped by bots.

The U.S. Enters the War[]

"Following the end of World War 2, Communism became the focus of U.S. military power. In 1950, the United States began their involvement in Indochina by approving 10 million dollars of aid to the French, who were fighting against the guerrilla forces of Ho Chi Minh. The U.S. saw the communist backed guerrillas as a threat to democratic society and their struggle to halt the spread of communism worldwide. Following the 1954 Geneva Conference, the United States began the support of the South Vietnamese and in 1960 sent 980 Advisors to South Vietnam. Through the early sixties, U.S. involvement increased as the North Vietnamese increased hostilities towards them and the South Vietnamese, culminating with N.V.A. torpedoes being fired at U.S.S. Maddox. On August 7, 1964 the United States Congress passed the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. This led to the introduction of ground troops into Southeast Asia."

— US Briefing

"In 1887, The French established colonial control over Indochina. This occupation lasted until World War 2, when the Japanese moved in and occupied Indochina. At the end of the Second World War, the French returned to claim the lands they once held. This was met by resistance in the form of the communist backed Viet Minh. The "First Indochina War" lasted until the French fell to the forces of the Viet Minh at Dien Bien Phu. The day after the fall of Dien Bien Phu, the Geneva Conference began in hopes of ending the hostilities. With the representatives having conflicting views, communist and democratic, Vietnam was "temporarily" divided along the 17th parallel. A reunification was to take place in 1956 through a democratic election between the communist Ho Chi Minh and the democratic Ngo Dinh Diem. With more populace in the North, Diem feared that the elections would be "fixed" in favor of Ho Chi Minh. In 1955, with the support of the U.S., Ngo Dinh Diem, called off elections. With corruption wide spread in the South, the North saw the opportunity for reunification."

— NVA Briefing

Six maps were intended for this section:

US Briefing NVA Briefing
January 15, 1965 - The U.S. begins Operation Game Warden in order to keep the North Vietnamese from using the Mekong Delta as a supply route to move supplies to the Viet Cong. The Operation's goal was to completely destroy the supply lines through the Delta thereby forcing the Viet Cong out of the Delta Region. January 15, 1965 - The N.V.A. had used the Ho Chi Minh trail, a road network through Laos and Cambodia, to move supplies to forces entrenched in the south. The southern end of the trail led to the Mekong Delta. This water way was used to move supplies from the Cambodian border to the covert forces in the Southeastern most regions of Vietnam.
US Briefing NVA Briefing
February 7, 1965 - "I've had enough of this." Following an attack by the Viet Cong on Camp Holloway, President Linden Johnson approves Operation Flaming Dart. In an effort to show the North Vietnamese that U.S. could not be attacked without a response, the U.S. drops 25 tons of bombs on the military facilities of the N.V.A. at Dong Hoi. February 7, 1965 - The N.V.A. were eager to keep the U.S. out of Vietnam. However, their actions and attacks against U.S. encampments forced the U.S. to retaliate. Feeling that they had to show the North Vietnamese a measure of resolve, the U.S. commenced bombing missions against N.V.A. targets in South Vietnam.
US Briefing NVA Briefing
November 14, 1965 - Prior to the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley, U.S. and N.V.A. troops had never met on the battlefield in major traditional combat. U.S. troops were sent into the valley after an attack on a Special Forces camp at Plei Me. Upon landing at LZ X-Ray, the troops find that they've landed in the middle of the N.V.A. 66th Regiment's base camp. Fierce fire fights begin and the battle lasts for two days, ending with an N.V.A. retreat into the jungle. 79 Americans are killed and 121 wounded. N.V.A. losses are estimated at 2000. November 14, 1965 - Viewing the U.S. as yet another foreign invader of their country, the N.V.A. moved on U.S. camps as they continued operations in the south. After an attack on a Special Forces base at Plei Me, the 66th and 33rd N.V.A. Regiments moved into the Ia Drang valley. The U.S. felt that the time was right to send ground forces into the valley in attempts to stop the N.V.A.'s movement. Prior to the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley, U.S. and N.V.A. troops had never met on the battlefield in major traditional combat.
US Briefing NVA Briefing
November 17, 1965 - Following the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley, troops of the 7th Cavalry are sent from LZ X-Ray to occupy nearby LZ Albany. Unknown to the U.S. at the time, the N.V.A. had held the 33rd Regiment in reserve. When the U.S. troops reached LZ Albany, they were ambushed. Over 100 U.S. soldiers were killed and nearly double that number were wounded in the ambush. November 17, 1965 - The 33rd N.V.A. regiment was held in reserve, waiting for the U.S. to move towards other positions in the valley. After the retreat of the 66th Regiment, the U.S. moved north towards an area they dubbed "Landing Zone Albany". Once they arrived, the foot soldiers were met with fierce fire from the 33rd Regiment. Over 100 U.S. soldiers we killed and nearly double that number were wounded in the ambush.
US Briefing NVA Briefing
July 18, 1966 - The North Vietnamese Army had been moving forces into the "DMZ", an area north of the Quang Tri province which separated North and South Vietnam. In reaction. the U.S. and South Vietnamese launched Operation Hastings, a search and destroy mission that was the largest combined military operation to date. July 18, 1966 - Lands north of Quang Tri province, bordered by the Gulf of Tonkin to the East and Laos in the west were deemed "The Demilitarized Zone" or DMZ. It was an area intended to be a buffer between the North and the South. However, the N.V.A. amassed troops and encampments along the DMZ. In reaction. the U.S. and South Vietnamese launched Operation Hastings, a 10,000 man search and destroy mission that was the largest combined military operation to date.
US Briefing NVA Briefing
October 2, 1966 – The Viet Cong fostered their presence in South Vietnam through extortion and terrorist tactics against people living in the small villages of the Vietnamese interior. Operation Irving was an attempt to remove the occupation of South Vietnamese villages in the region. October 2, 1966 – Following in the traditions of the Viet Minh, the Viet Cong intermingled with the villagers in the south. At times these villagers were sympathizers, at others hostages. The villagers could not trust the Viet Cong and their terrorist tactics nor could they trust the South Vietnamese forces and their "puppet masters". Operation Irving was an attempt to remove the occupation of South Vietnamese villages in the region.

The Turning Point[]

"Tet is a festival similar to New Year's and Christmas, rolled into one. In each year of the war, a cease fire was called for the celebration of Tet and in each year, that cease fire was broken. In 1968, The N.V.A. co-coordinated a massive 80,000 man attack against over 150 targets in South Vietnam. This became known as the Tet Offensive and is widely believed to be the turning point in the war. Although a tactical and strategic victory for the United States and South Vietnamese Forces, the political fallout of the Tet Offensive was devastating for the U.S. Political officials had assured the U.S. people that the war was almost won. The credibility of this statement was brought into question when the North Vietnamese displayed massive strength in their attack on the South. From this point onward, the question of victory would be a matter of perspective."

— US Briefing

"In January of 1968, The NVA co-ordinated a massive offensive against the South. The plan was to attack on all fronts at one time. With a few sparse exceptions, the N.V.A. was repelled at each point of attack. Although beaten from a military standpoint, the N.V.A. proved their resolve to reunite their country at all costs. Interestingly, the N.V.A. and the V.C. were not seeing eye to eye on all issues regarding the war and a post war Vietnam. The V.C., to an extent were becoming an issue for the N.V.A. The Tet Offensive saw massive devastation to the V.C. ranks with almost every single Viet Cong attacker either killed or captured. Some argue that this was part of the N.V.A. plan. If so, then things were going fairly well for the N.V.A. in terms of their enemies strength. The U.S. had been expounding about their victories and the state of the war on the home front. The people of the U.S. had heard that the war was coming to a close and that the N.V.A. could not survive under the massive losses they were experiencing. The show of force displayed by the North shed much doubt on the validity of official information in the U.S. Support began to dwindle and the anti-war movement gained momentum."

— NVA Briefing

Five maps were intended for this section:

US Briefing NVA Briefing
January 31, 1968 - U.S. Forces had not been allowed to station themselves in the ancient imperial city of Hue. It was a city that was off limits to U.S. soldiers. As a result, the 25 day fight between the North and South Vietnamese reached a level that was arguably unmatched with any other conflict during the war. January 31, 1968 - Armed with the knowledge that Hue was off limits to U.S. Forces, the North felt this was to be one of the least demanding victories of the offensive. The North and South fought for 25 days over control of the old imperial city with the N.V.A. eventually gaining the upper hand.
US Briefing NVA Briefing
January 31, 1968 - Precariously positioned near the DMZ, Quang Tri city was directly in the path of movement for the North Vietnamese and an important conquest. On the evening of the 30th, sappers entered the city in hopes of disrupting the city's defenders prior to a more focused attack by the 812th Regiment. However, the weather played against the N.V.A., and heavy rains delayed the movement into the city long enough for the ARVN forces to prepare for the onslaught. January 31, 1968 - On the evening of the 30th, sappers entered the city of Quang Tri as a first line of attack. their mission was to disrupt the forces within the city and soften them up for the blow to be dealt the following day. However, with the wet season upon them and in unfamiliar territory, the NVA were delayed in their movement towards the city. When they arrived, they were met by ARVN forces with U.S. support that feverishly defended the city and the old Citadel.
US Briefing NVA Briefing
February 7, 1968 - During the 77 day siege of Khe Sahn Combat Base, the N.V.A. moved in on nearby Lang Vei Special Forces Base. The Base was assaulted by a massive force of N.V.A. troops and heavy armor. It stands as one of two attacks during the Tet Offensive that could not be repelled. February 7, 1968 - With the Nearby Khe Sahn Combat Base under siege, the N.V.A. descend upon nearby Lang Vei Special Forces Base. An estimated 40,000 N.V.A. troops and a group of PT 76 tanks move towards 22 Green Berets and 400 civilian soldiers.
US Briefing NVA Briefing
February 23, 1968 - Capitalizing on the lack of U.S. support, the N.V.A. forces claim Hue during the Tet Offensive. However, the ARVN forces refuse to let the city rest in communist hands. With newly arrived reinforcements they mount a counter offensive in efforts of reclaiming the city and by dawn, the last remnants of N.V.A. occupation is gone. February 23, 1968 - Following the capture of Hue, the N.V.A. forces begin settling into the city and the captured bases of the ARVN forces. Knowing the importance of controlling the major cities in the south, ARVN forces with U.S. support storm back in, attempting to reclaim the old imperial city.
US Briefing NVA Briefing
February 29th, 1968 - The Khe Sahn Combat Base was constructed near the DMZ at one of the most strategically advantageous locations in South Vietnam. It allowed the U.S. to observe movements within the DMZ as well as along the Ho Chi Minh trail. The North Vietnamese were more than eager to capture the base and remove this strategic advantage from the U.S. The 77 day siege against Khe Sahn Combat Base stands as one of the bloodiest and hard fought conflicts of the Vietnam War. After nearly a month of operations and siege tactics against Khe Sahn Combat Base, the N.V.A. moved in for the kill. February 29th, 1968 - The DMZ was the most contested area in Vietnam. All parties wished to control the area. The N.V.A. wanted it to assist in interdictions against the South. The U.S. wanted it to halt the movement of the N.V.A. In 1967, the N.V.A. laid siege a Marine base at Con Thien. Despite being repelled by superior firepower, the N.V.A. proved that they could decide where and when to attack. They used this advantage during the Tet offensive. This time, their target was the Khe Sahn Combat Base.

The End Draws Near[]

"At the end of the decade, the U.S. led by President Richard Nixon began withdrawing forces from Vietnam. This was due in part to the political climate in the United States and the waning support for the war. The so called "credibility gap" was an issue and the U.S. people could not trust the words of their leaders as they did not coincide with the actions in the war. Despite strategic and militaristic victories at almost every turn, the U.S. was in a poor political position."

— US Briefing

"By the end of the decade, the U.S. was in a strange position. With superior firepower and training, they were winning the war from a military standpoint. Their strategy to beat the N.V.A. through attrition was working on paper with hundreds of thousands of North Vietnamese troops listed as casualties. However, despite the heavy losses, the North managed to secure more reinforcements. The facts of the war were difficult for the U.S. public to understand and as such, they doubted the validity of reports on the war. In addition, the government approved actions that seemed contradictory. The U.S. had begun sending troops home, withdrawing them from combat and putting forth the appearance that they were reducing hostilities. At the same time, they approved the expansion of the war to include Cambodia. This came on the heels of public relation nightmares such as the My Lai Massacre and 1969's secret bombings of Cambodia. The Antiwar movement gained strength and led to an escalation of other movements such as the Civil Rights movement and the Women's Liberation movement. The U.S. government was strained, facing battles on all fronts."

— NVA Briefing

Three maps were intended for this section:

US Briefing NVA Briefing
May 1, 1970 - The N.V.A. and V.C. had used Cambodia as a base of operations for assaults into South Vietnam. Attacks would be launched against U.S. and South Vietnamese forces followed by a retreat into Cambodia where the U.S. would not follow. Not wanting to be the first U.S. president to lose a war, President Nixon approved the expansion of the ground war to include Cambodia. May 1, 1970 - The Ho Chi Minh trail was the North's main supply route to forces in the south. This route was a difficult target for the U.S. Bombing runs proved pointless for when a disruption was created in the route, manpower soon arrived to repair the damage and reopen the trail. In addition to the geographical and tactical issues, the path ran through Laos and Cambodia, not Vietnam. The U.S. had policies that prevented ground troops from moving into those countries, thereby providing the N.V.A. and V.C. with a convenient escape route. This changed in 1970 when the U.S. government approved the presence of ground troops in Cambodia.
US Briefing NVA Briefing
May 1, 1970 - The U.S. had confined official ground operations to within the borders of South Vietnam. However, the CIA and later the MACVSOG had been involved in Cambodia and Laos since the late 1950's. In 1970, the U.S. invaded into Cambodia to halt operations and close the Ho Chi Minh Trail, the major supply route of the NVA and VC. May 1, 1970 - Although official ground operation in Cambodia did not begin until 1970, the U.S. had covert operatives and secret forces of one sort or another in Southeast Asia since 1945. In addition, the U.S. had condoned a variety of air missions inside Laos and Cambodia aimed at furthering their agenda, preventing the spread of communism. These facts were being brought to light on the home front and faith in the government was declining steadily.
US Briefing NVA Briefing
September 16, 1972 - The U.S. had begun the "Vietnamization" of the war. They would withdraw their forces while increasing the support given to South Vietnamese forces. In the Spring of 1972, the N.V.A. launched the Eastertide Offensive against these better prepared South Vietnamese forces and a few token U.S. forces. 200,000 men moved against the South in a three pronged attack. After a month of battle, the ARVN in Quang Tri city felt it futile to remain and they abandoned the city. The Commander of the South Vietnamese forces was fired and replaced with General Ngo Quang Truong. He rallied the troops and launched a counter offensive. By September of 1972, the ARVN had moved into the city and set about the task of recapturing it. September 15, 1972 - The "Vietnamization" of the war was a plan to transfer resources equipment and knowledge to the A.R.V.N. thereby making them self sufficient. The U.S. had comparatively few troops in Vietnam with many acting in an advisory role. In the Spring of 1972, the N.V.A. launched the Eastertide Offensive. 200,000 men moved against the South in a three pronged attack. The attacks came against regions near the DMZ, central South Vietnam, and the deep south. In Quang Tri city, near the DMZ, the N.V.A. and the ARVN fought for a month to control the city. N.V.A. artillery bombarded the city, destroying nearly everything. The ARVN troops abandoned the city. After some strife at the higher military ranks, new leadership was put in place and troops were sent to reclaim the city. At 8p.m. on September 15, the flag of South Vietnam once again flew from the top of the citadel.

Outcomes[]

"The ARVN proved that with proper leadership and support, they could defend themselves against the North. The U.S. attempted to negotiate peace while the war raged on. On January 27, 1973 the Paris Peace accords were signed. The North agreed to a cease fire. The U.S. agreed to halt all military actions against the North, withdraw all troops from South Vietnam, and help to reconstruct a war ravaged Vietnam. The South agreed to a reunification by peaceful means and the continued occupation by North Vietnamese troops in South Vietnam. In the fall of 1974, with the U.S. government in turmoil, the North Vietnamese broke the Paris Peace accord. By the end of 1974, the NVA and VC controlled half of the South. In January of 1975, they pushed South toward Saigon. As people were frantically airlifted from the roof of the U.S. embassy in Saigon, the South fell to communism."

— US Wrap Up Briefing

"The war in Southeast Asia was costly and frustrating for the United States. Their mission was to maintain a noncommunist Vietnam and for the years where they were actively involved, 1965 to 1973, they had great success. In 1973, the United States signed the Paris Peace Accords and ended their involvement in Vietnam. From a military stand point, the combined forces won almost every conflict during the war. However, these successes are overshadowed by the fact that in 1974, the N.V.A. broke the accord and moved against the South, gaining control in 1975. The casualties of war tell an interesting story. The U.S. lists over 58,000 killed in action, 10,000 of those being "non-hostile" casualties. The ARVN lists over 223,000. The North Vietnamese suffered over 1.1 million killed in action. The civilian costs were by far the highest. 2 million civilians were killed in the north and a further 2 million were killed in the south. All tolled, almost 14% of the total population of Vietnam lost their lives."

— NVA Wrap Up Briefing

Current status[]

BFVietnam Tour Menu

The menu of the Tour of Duty mode after accessing it through Command Prompt.

  • The Tour of Duty mode has not been completely removed from the game, and is still accessible by running Battlefield Vietnam through Command Prompt with the following parameters:
>BfVietnam.exe +restart 1 +goToInterface 1
However, even if the Tour of Duty mode is activated, it currently has several bugs:
  1. Clicking "Next" at the end of a map crashes the game. To circumvent this, click "close" and the next map should be available.
  2. Statistics of Operation Irving was not saved, preventing further progress. While the "Next" button crashes the game for other levels, on this level it fails to appear at all.
  3. While in the middle of a campaign with one faction, starting another campaign with the other faction wipes all progress of the first campaign.
  4. Nonsensical calculations of statistics such as a 125% hit ratio.
  • In the file BfVietnam\game.rfa\GameModeSettings\DefaultTourOfDuty.wst, the US campaign is listed above the NVA campaign, identifiable by the list of unimplemented US insignias, with the NVA campaign listed below with equally unimplemented insignias. However, as the game recognizes the NVA as "Team 1" and the US as "Team 2", it is possible that the kit specified for each map was intended for the opposing team.
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